Seminars -The Global Perspectives, Marginalisation and Thriving Communities Research Cluster – Gender-Based Violence Research Group Seminar Series

The Global Perspectives, Marginalisation and Thriving Communities Research Cluster will be presenting a series of four weekly sessions on Gender Based Violence (GBV). The sessions will focus on theory, policy and practice and incorporate survivors’ voices. All sessions are on Tuesdays 4-5.30p.m, starting 4th May 2021. ​Could I draw your attention in particular to the third seminar on Tuesday 18th May which is a presentation of the preliminary findings from our research project DASC (domestic abuse, safeguarding and COVID-19). 

The GBV research group is part of the Global Perspectives, Marginalisation and Thriving Communities research cluster, based in the Faculty of Health, Psychology and Social Care, Manchester Metropolitan University. Our group focuses on the experiences of survivors and perpetrators, as well as those of practitioners, activists, and policy makers. Our research explores understandings, representations, and experiences of gender-based violence across various local, national and global contexts. We seek to explore how GBV operates and is lived and experienced at the intersections of gender, race, sexuality, class, disability, nationality.  


Session 1: Tuesday 4th May 2021 4-5.30pm – Black Masculinities & GBV in South Africa: A decolonial feminist lens

Dr Simone Peters: Post Doctorate Fellow on the First 1000 Days of Life project (university of Cape Town).

Simone Peters completed her PhD in the Department of Psychology at University of Cape Town (UCT). She is currently a Post Doctorate Fellow on the First 1000 Days of Life project. Much of her work focuses on marginalised black masculinities and how they talk about their gendered identities. Her work focuses on questions of how black men challenge dominant narratives and how their race, gender, class, sexuality, and locations influence their experiences and talk. She is interested photovoice methodologies as well as in reflexive, narrative and intersectional approaches to doing critical qualitative research.

In this talk I reflect on my work over the past 5 years with black masculinities in Cape Town, South Africa. I will explore how men construct their masculinity in relation to their race, their class, their colonial histories, their locations, and other identities. Black men, particularly ‘coloured’ men, have been found to be the most likely to perpetuate intimate partner violence, rape and gang rape. It has also been suggested that violence, drug abuse, gangsterism and alcoholism is a prominent feature of communities in which those who identify as ‘coloured’, during apartheid reside. These narratives have led to black men and their communities being reduced to negative stereotypes. In looking to decolonial feminist methodologies and thinking, I hope to present new ways of researching and thinking about black masculinities in relation to violence and how these methods allow for black men to present alternative ways of doing masculinity.

Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/black-masculinities-gbv-in-south-africa-a-decolonial-feminist-lens-tickets-151963816867


Session 2: Tuesday 11th May 2021 4-5.30pm – How the Ruby service is supporting domestic abuse survivors through Covid-19

Sharon Cooper and Heather Bromilow (The Ruby service)

Sharon Cooper is the service manager for PSS turnaround, Ruby and New Leaf. She is a qualified social worker and has worked for PSS for 20 years. Heather Bromilow is senior practitioner for the services and has worked for PSS for over 10 years. She worked in domestic abuse services prior to joining the team at PSS. She is a qualified IDVA/ISVA

It’s been widely reported that the coronavirus pandemic has increased the number of people experiencing domestic abuse. With national lockdowns keeping us indoors, the homes of people experiencing domestic abuse have become pressure-cookers, with many people feeling even more isolated than ever before. Since the start of the COVID-19 outbreak, The Ruby Service at PSS have supported over 180 people experiencing domestic violence – up 67% after the first lockdown compared to the same time in 2019. We will discuss the impact of Covid-19 on people in abusive relationships and what we are doing to support victims and their families. The Ruby service provide a specialist domestic abuse service to people experiencing domestic abuse and also provide information and support to females at risk of and within criminal justice system.

Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/how-the-ruby-service-is-supporting-domestic-abuse-survivors-through-covid19-tickets-151965008431


Session 3: Tuesday 18th May 2021 4-5.30pm – Domestic Abuse Safeguarding during Covid-19: Initial findings from practice

Debbie Thackray, Gayatri Nambiar-Greenwood & Margaret Struthers and Prof. Khatidja Chantler, Manchester Metropolitan University

The DASC research team led by Prof. Khatidja Chantler. Prof. Chantler is co-lead of the Global Perspectives Research Cluster at Manchester Metropolitan University. Her key areas of research expertise are gender-based violence, particularly within minoritised communities, self-harm, gender and ethnicity. Dr Debbie Thackray is co-lead of the GBV research group and her areas of research centre on domestic abuse. She is currently involved in two research projects, DASC and an evaluation of a domestic abuse training programme for women with learning disabilities. She has published work relating to adult social care and MARAC. Dr Gayatri Nambiar-Greenwood is a Senior Lecturer in Nursing. Her research and educational interests are related to Culturally Sensitive education and care, Unconscious Bias, Marginalised Communities and Service User Perspectives. She is the Lead for Inclusive Curriculum for the Faculty of Health, Psychology and Social Care at MMU. Margaret Struthers is a registered social worker with practice experience in children and families work, criminal justice (youth and adult) and specialist domestic/sexual abuse work with both perpetrators and survivors. Research interests focus on violence and abuse with a specific interest in practice led/practice based research.

It’s been widely reported that the coronavirus pandemic has increased the number of people experiencing domestic abuse. With national lockdowns keeping us indoors, the homes of people experiencing domestic abuse have become pressure-cookers, with many people feeling even more isolated than ever before. Since the start of the COVID-19 outbreak, The Ruby Service at PSS have supported over 180 people experiencing domestic violence – up 67% after the first lockdown compared to the same time in 2019. We will discuss the impact of Covid-19 on people in abusive relationships and what we are doing to support victims and their families. The Ruby service provide a specialist domestic abuse service to people experiencing domestic abuse and also provide information and support to females at risk of and within criminal justice system.

Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/domestic-abuse-safeguarding-during-covid-19-initial-findings-from-practice-tickets-151965776729


Session 4: Tuesday 25th May 2021 4-5.30pm – New Neurological Approaches to Effectively Treating Trauma

Humera Quddoos M.A Psychosynthesis Psychotherapy, Lifespan Integration Practitioner

Humera is a UKCP registered psychotherapist with over 20 years experience in private practice. Her particular skills include working with trauma, sexual violence and addictions. Prior to moving into full time private practice 10 years ago, Humera worked extensively in the voluntary sector. This included work supporting women and individuals at rape crisis centres, domestic violence refuges, mental health residential services and community services. Her work has also involved DV and sexual abuse awareness training with allied support agencies for example: midwives, social workers, and police officers. She also has evaluation skills and has completed an independent evaluation for Barnado’s Phoenix Project (2004), a specialist Asian community domestic violence support service in Bolton.

The emergence of an understanding that neurological functioning of the brain is ‘plastic’ alongside a neurological mapping of trauma has led to the development of alternative therapeutic interventions for individuals who have experienced trauma. Trauma is a far reaching and encompassing term that can include: Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), domestic violence, as well as single episodic trauma for example, a car accident, adult sexual assault, traumatic bereavement etc. Lifespan Integration is one such neurological therapy. This seminar will give a brief overview of the neurological impact of trauma, and how that intersects with vulnerability in relationships, development of addictions, educational attainment and functional life skills. It will then look at how Lifespan Integration offers a very different therapeutic contact in addressing trauma and its ongoing legacy. This approach is revolutionary in that, with one treatment, PTSD effects, with survivors of single adult sexual assault trauma are significantly reduced. Treatment times for other traumas, relief and recovery from addiction, complex PTSD, and pre-verbal trauma are also addressed by this therapy.

Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/new-neurological-approaches-to-effectively-treating-trauma-tickets-151966147839